i was Storytelling in the womb (or so i tell myself).

At age 12, I turned to writing. I felt unheard and unseen by my Dominican family who treated me as fragile as a figurine. To be fair, I was as quiet as a mouse and would run off crying whenever a bug flew overhead. In NYC, that was often. 

Writing became my escape. I took to pen and paper to cope with my father’s abandonment, to ignore my mother’s coddling, to bash my sister's bossiness, and to express my love to the boys that never liked me back. 

Writing gave me a voice. At age 17, in front of my white peers at Phillips Academy Andover, I recited "I Dare You," a poem about the breakdown of a close, female friendship. I read the words and my former friend to filth as wildly as the curls in my hair, as big as the gold hoop hearings that clung to my lobes, and as colorfully as the red Hugo Boss jeans that clung to my waist with a black, leather belt.

Writing became my outlet. I tapped on my computer keyboard for hours, pouring my heart onto a page. When sharing my stories online, I felt heard and seen rather than ignored and forgotten. I knew that I had a gift. That my point-of-view as a first-generation Dominican-American mattered. I didn't see my worth and value within my family and through the eyes of men, but I knew I had this. 


Writing became the tool that cultivated my creative career. In 2006, after graduating from Rowan University with a Masters in Writing Arts, I published my first story. Since then, my relationship essays, journalistic pieces, and lifestyle articles have been featured in Cosmopolitan, Well + Good, PopSugar, People Magazine, Parents, Hip Latina, Madamenoire, and many more. Coined the “Latina Carrie Bradshaw" by fans, I self-published my first book, Love Trips, a collection of personal essays based on my previously published dating column on Migente and Latina Magazine. In 2015, I partnered with Latina as a relationship writer and expert and solely created their relationship, dating, and sex content. That same year I hit the airwaves as the host of "Ask Sujeiry," a relationship advice series on Latina, and as the host of my own self-titled SiriusXM radio show, Love Sujeiry.

Today, I run Love Sujeiry, a multimedia business that celebrates, cultivates, and shines the light on Creative women of color.  We create spaces and opportunities so we are seen and be heard. 

Writing gave me a voice. At age 17, in front of my white peers at Phillips Academy Andover, I recited "I Dare You," a poem about the breakdown of a close, female friendship. I read the words and my former friend to filth as wildly as the curls in my hair, as big as the gold hoop hearings that clung to my lobes, and as colorfully as the red Hugo Boss jeans that clung to my waist with a black, leather belt.

Writing became my outlet. I tapped on my computer keyboard for hours, pouring my heart onto a page. When sharing my stories online, I felt heard and seen rather than ignored and forgotten. I knew that I had a gift. That my point-of-view as a first-generation Dominican-American mattered. I didn't see my worth and value within my family and through the eyes of men, but I knew I had this. 

Writing became the tool that cultivated my creative career. In 2006, after graduating from Rowan University with a Masters in Writing Arts, I published my first story. Since then, my relationship essays, journalistic pieces, and lifestyle articles have been featured in Cosmopolitan, Well + Good, PopSugar, People Magazine, Parents, Hip Latina, Madamenoire, and many more. Coined the “Latina Carrie Bradshaw" by fans, I self-published my first book, Love Trips, a collection of personal essays based on my previously published dating column on Migente and Latina Magazine. In 2015, I partnered with Latina as a relationship writer and expert and solely created their relationship, dating, and sex content. That same year I hit the airwaves as the host of "Ask Sujeiry," a relationship advice series on Latina, and as the host of my own self-titled SiriusXM radio show, Love Sujeiry.

Today, I run Love Sujeiry, a multimedia business that celebrates, cultivates, and shines the light on BIPOC Writers and Creatives. We create spaces and opportunities for Creatives to be seen and be heard.